The Blinding Light of God’s Love

Yesterday afternoon a divine errand led me into the city center and onto a bus headed south-west of Nairobi. The only vacant seat next to a window was the one at the back and a older couple was already occupying the center part of it.
I was struck by the beauty of the elderly lady who seemed to be looking and smiling right at me and yet sort of through me. I realized immediately that she her excellently big brown clear eyes were visually impaired. The man seated next to her lifted his head for a moment to smile at me and move her legs slightly out of the way to give me room to pass. I settled and then focused on them. The man was besotted with her. She had a dried tear stain on her right cheek but her eyes reflected deep joy as she listened to the man speak just loud enough for her to hear. A deep sight, beautifully so 😍. I had to painfully look away to occupy my mind with the sights of the CBD.
 
I do not believe in coincidences and as I later reflected on this scene, and the deep joy it evoked in me, I realized that God had given me an illustration of His relationship with me. When I am on a journey led by Him, my Groom Eternal, I do not really have to know where He is leading me – that he does, is enough to get me there. His Voice and Manner is simply Love incarnate, and many times He words to me are for my ears only – because He has captured my attention and my love. His…Being…His Loving breaks me beautifully to the point of tears. He knows my blindness and sometimes my deafness, but He made and keeps His covenant with me – with my permission sometimes 😉, and His Seeing, Speaking and Hearing, covers beyond anything that I could be capable of even if I could see all the time. I LOVE absolutely that He Loves me unabashedly, without seeking anyone’s permission to favor me however He pleases. In fact throughout the journey the words that kept ringing in my spirit was ‘God is in heaven and He does whatever pleases Him.’ Psalm 115:3. And that is my reason to smile today. I don’t know if that couple knows how much they helped me by just being there…that’s a story for another day…but may I have that impact on others who would never speak to me. Shalom.
 
“Who is blind but My servant [Israel]? Or deaf like My messenger whom I send? Who is blind like the one who is at peace with Me [who has been admitted to covenant relationship with Me]? Yes, who is blind like the Lord’s servant?
 
You have seen many things, but you do not observe or apprehend their true meaning. His ears are open, but he hears not!”
Isaiah 42:19-20
 
“And I will bring the blind by a way that they know not; I will lead them in paths that they have not known. I will make darkness into light before them and make uneven places into a plain. These things I have determined to do [for them]; and I will not leave them forsaken.” Isaiah 42:16 AMP
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Keratoconus: Esther Thairu’s Story

As told to Vip Ogola by Esther, her father Stephen Thairu and their good Samaritan Mr. Kamal Sanghani

Stephen Thairu, Esther Thairu with Kamal Sanghani.JPG

Esther: I was young, 2 years old. I had eye trouble and started going to hospital for eye drops. I could see maybe, 30 centimeters and my eyes would pain. The doctors told me it was treatable. It reached a point where I was told I would go in for an operation. I was not afraid even when I saw the razors. I thought it would be painful but it wasn’t. I was anaesthetized and I woke up seeing better. I was in hospital for four days, three of those with my eyes bandaged.

Stephen: Esther was born in Loitokitok. She started having problems with her eyes at the age of two years. She would wake up and find her eyes clogged shut with pus. This happened annually between April and August and we suspected it had something to do with the cold weather. We took her to the district hospital there and she was told she had allergies that would resolve themselves by the time she was eight years old. She was given medication for this.

Esther Thairu.JPGEsther: I do very well in school. I am now 13 years old, and apart from academics, I play football.

Stephen: We moved to Githurai and Esther joined Mercies Academy where she is currently in Standard 6, having dropped back a year due to her medical challenges. Since she was a bright student she caught the attention of her teachers. Teacher Teresia noticed her problems with her eyes and advised us to change to Lions Hospital in Loresho. In the initial year of her treatment, they kept changing drugs. Her right eye was in terrible shape and needed urgent surgery. The left one was also in bad shape. The cost of surgery would be Kshs 350,000/ and they were not taking NHIF. I was confused. I was advised to take her to KNH due to the more manageable costs. On examining her, they concluded that her eyes were badly off. They only perform surgeries once as year so they referred her back to Lions for more urgent attention. We found that the costs there would be the same. I talked to my employer who suggested that we sell my father’s land to offset the costs. She talked to Mr. Kamal Sanghani of the Rotary club about my case and they referred us to Dr. S.P. Amin. We had to wait until he was available.

Kamal: Dr. Amin is in the Board of Lions. He was my contact. I would talk to him and then talk to Stephen. The doctors of Lions are good friends of mine. My family agreed that we would sponsor Esther. We did not know her then, and we have since sponsored three others.  One of the Rotarians told me about her. It took time but Stephen was both patient and persistent keeping me on my toes. Initially it was difficult to get a Cornea. We did not loose home. My mother insisted pushed me from the home front. Since we were working on a tight budget, we agreed that she goes to Lions four or five times. She is a bright student so we wanted to see her excel. There were so many issues and at one point I almost lost my temper with the hospital. Finally we received a Cornea for her from India.

Stephen: They started with her right eye. Then after two months they did Cross linking. She was in a private ward at the hospital and was the only child admitted there at that time.

Esther: I did not go to school. I was told not to by the doctor as it was possible to play a bad game and hurt my eyes. I also needed to avoid dust. I stayed home with Mum and really missed Shule.

Stephen: We had to go to hospital every Saturday after for check-up as she was on medication.

Esther: They would change my specks, I think twice between the first and second operations.

Stephen: They needed to do this to adapt to her strengthening eyesight.

Esther: After I did my first operation, Mr. Francis Mwangi my teacher at my school, Mercies School in Guthurai 44, put me to sit in front of the class. He then moved me to the back of the class to see if I had improved after two week. I had. Fellow students were also supportive in helping me catch up with them, especially Peter Mutuku. I am in Standard 6.

Stephen: She is supposed to be in standard 7 but she lost a lot of time that year and was not able to do her exams.

Esther: My grades are good. I get 350+. At the cross linking the doctors told me that I would go through pain for the night. I stayed indoors for three days with Mum. I am the first of three children and the only daughter of my parents. My mother sells vegetables and my father digs for a living. They gave me eye-drops to put after every two hours.  I was told I could go to school after a week. This was in March 2015. Since that time I have only had my specs changed once. I am in no pain and I can see relatively well.

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